The Eye Institute for Medicine & Surgery
Eye Doctor Melbourne FL
(321) 722-4443

Presbyopia

What is Presbyopia?

Presbyopia (which literally means "aging eye") is an age-related eye condition that makes it more difficult to see very close.

When you are young, the lens in your eye is soft and flexible. The lens of the eye changes its shape easily, allowing you to focus on objects both close and far away.

After the age of 40, the lens becomes more rigid. Because the lens can’t change shape as easily as it once did, it is more difficult to read at close range. This normal condition is called presbyopia.

Since nearly everyone develops presbyopia, if a person also has myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) or astigmatism, the conditions will combine. People with myopia may have fewer problems with presbyopia.


Treatment for Presbyopia

Eyeglasses with bifocal or progressive addition lenses (PALs) are the most common correction for presbyopia. Bifocal means two points of focus: the main part of the spectacle lens contains a prescription for distance vision, while the lower portion of the lens holds the stronger near prescription for close work.

Progressive addition lenses are similar to bifocal lenses, but they offer a more gradual visual transition between the two prescriptions, with no visible line between them.

Reading glasses are another choice. Unlike bifocals and PALs, which most people wear all day, reading glasses typically are worn just during close work.

If you wear contact lenses, your eye doctor can prescribe reading glasses that you wear while your contacts are in. We have high quality readers available in the Optical Boutique.

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